Risk factors for occupational violence and aggression in the emergency department
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Keywords

emergency department
emergency services
occupational aggresion
occupational aggresion occupational violence

How to Cite

Pouryahya, P. ., & Lim , A. (2021). Risk factors for occupational violence and aggression in the emergency department. Mediterranean Journal of Emergency Medicine, (28), 29-32. Retrieved from https://mjemonline.com/index.php/mjem/article/view/103

Abstract

Objective: To examine shift characteristics that increase the risk of occupational violence and aggression.

Methods: This study was a secondary analysis of survey results obtained from ‘Violence and abuse against staff in the emergency department, a descriptive analysis of a two-centre staff survey’. The purpose was to identify shift characteristics that were predictive of submitting a survey response describing a violent event. Univariable and multivariable binomial logistic regressions were used to identify significant predictors. Aggregated data from phase I findings was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for each day of the week.

Results: The adjusted OR of experiencing violence if the respondent was a nurse was OR 2.92 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50, 6.00], p < 0.01. There was a higher risk of violence on post meridiem (PM) (OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.45, 4.83, p < 0.01) and night shifts (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.51,4.71], p < 0.001). Saturday was the only day of the week identified as a significant risk factor (OR 4.92 [95% CI 1.60,18.13], p = 0.002).

Conclusions: Based on this cohort of emergency workers, the shift characteristics that were most predictive of submitting a survey describing a violent encounter were PM or night shifts, whether the health provider is a nurse, or whether the shift was performed on a Saturday.

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